Storage Foundation and High Availability 7.4.2 Configuration and Upgrade Guide - Linux

Last Published:
Product(s): InfoScale & Storage Foundation (7.4.2)
Platform: Linux
  1. Section I. Introduction to SFHA
    1. Introducing Storage Foundation and High Availability
      1. About Storage Foundation High Availability
        1.  
          About Veritas Replicator Option
      2.  
        About Veritas InfoScale Operations Manager
      3. About Storage Foundation and High Availability features
        1.  
          About LLT and GAB
        2.  
          About I/O fencing
        3.  
          About global clusters
      4.  
        About Veritas Services and Operations Readiness Tools (SORT)
      5. About configuring SFHA clusters for data integrity
        1.  
          About I/O fencing for SFHA in virtual machines that do not support SCSI-3 PR
        2. About I/O fencing components
          1.  
            About data disks
          2.  
            About coordination points
          3.  
            About preferred fencing
  2. Section II. Configuration of SFHA
    1. Preparing to configure
      1. I/O fencing requirements
        1.  
          Coordinator disk requirements for I/O fencing
        2.  
          CP server requirements
        3.  
          Non-SCSI-3 I/O fencing requirements
    2. Preparing to configure SFHA clusters for data integrity
      1. About planning to configure I/O fencing
        1.  
          Typical SFHA cluster configuration with server-based I/O fencing
        2.  
          Recommended CP server configurations
      2. Setting up the CP server
        1.  
          Planning your CP server setup
        2.  
          Installing the CP server using the installer
        3.  
          Configuring the CP server cluster in secure mode
        4.  
          Setting up shared storage for the CP server database
        5.  
          Configuring the CP server using the installer program
        6. Configuring the CP server manually
          1.  
            Configuring the CP server manually for HTTPS-based communication
          2.  
            Generating the key and certificates manually for the CP server
          3.  
            Completing the CP server configuration
        7. Configuring CP server using response files
          1.  
            Response file variables to configure CP server
          2.  
            Sample response file for configuring the CP server on single node VCS cluster
          3.  
            Sample response file for configuring the CP server on SFHA cluster
        8.  
          Verifying the CP server configuration
    3. Configuring SFHA
      1. Configuring Storage Foundation High Availability using the installer
        1.  
          Overview of tasks to configure SFHA using the product installer
        2.  
          Required information for configuring Storage Foundation and High Availability Solutions
        3.  
          Starting the software configuration
        4.  
          Specifying systems for configuration
        5.  
          Configuring the cluster name
        6.  
          Configuring private heartbeat links
        7.  
          Configuring the virtual IP of the cluster
        8.  
          Configuring SFHA in secure mode
        9. Configuring a secure cluster node by node
          1.  
            Configuring the first node
          2.  
            Configuring the remaining nodes
          3.  
            Completing the secure cluster configuration
        10.  
          Adding VCS users
        11.  
          Configuring SMTP email notification
        12.  
          Configuring SNMP trap notification
        13.  
          Configuring global clusters
        14. Completing the SFHA configuration
          1.  
            Verifying the NIC configuration
        15.  
          About Veritas License Audit Tool
        16. Verifying and updating licenses on the system
          1.  
            Checking licensing information on the system
          2.  
            Replacing a SFHA keyless license with another keyless license
          3.  
            Replacing a SFHA keyless license with a permanent license
      2.  
        Configuring SFDB
    4. Configuring SFHA clusters for data integrity
      1. Setting up disk-based I/O fencing using installer
        1.  
          Initializing disks as VxVM disks
        2. Checking shared disks for I/O fencing
          1.  
            Verifying Array Support Library (ASL)
          2.  
            Verifying that the nodes have access to the same disk
          3.  
            Testing the disks using vxfentsthdw utility
        3.  
          Configuring disk-based I/O fencing using installer
        4.  
          Refreshing keys or registrations on the existing coordination points for disk-based fencing using the installer
      2. Setting up server-based I/O fencing using installer
        1.  
          Refreshing keys or registrations on the existing coordination points for server-based fencing using the installer
        2. Setting the order of existing coordination points for server-based fencing using the installer
          1.  
            About deciding the order of existing coordination points
          2.  
            Setting the order of existing coordination points using the installer
      3.  
        Setting up non-SCSI-3 I/O fencing in virtual environments using installer
      4.  
        Setting up majority-based I/O fencing using installer
      5.  
        Enabling or disabling the preferred fencing policy
    5. Manually configuring SFHA clusters for data integrity
      1. Setting up disk-based I/O fencing manually
        1.  
          Removing permissions for communication
        2.  
          Identifying disks to use as coordinator disks
        3.  
          Setting up coordinator disk groups
        4.  
          Creating I/O fencing configuration files
        5.  
          Modifying VCS configuration to use I/O fencing
        6.  
          Verifying I/O fencing configuration
      2. Setting up server-based I/O fencing manually
        1.  
          Preparing the CP servers manually for use by the SFHA cluster
        2.  
          Generating the client key and certificates manually on the client nodes
        3. Configuring server-based fencing on the SFHA cluster manually
          1.  
            Sample vxfenmode file output for server-based fencing
        4.  
          Configuring CoordPoint agent to monitor coordination points
        5.  
          Verifying server-based I/O fencing configuration
      3. Setting up non-SCSI-3 fencing in virtual environments manually
        1.  
          Sample /etc/vxfenmode file for non-SCSI-3 fencing
      4. Setting up majority-based I/O fencing manually
        1.  
          Creating I/O fencing configuration files
        2.  
          Modifying VCS configuration to use I/O fencing
        3.  
          Verifying I/O fencing configuration
    6. Performing an automated SFHA configuration using response files
      1.  
        Configuring SFHA using response files
      2.  
        Response file variables to configure SFHA
      3.  
        Sample response file for SFHA configuration
    7. Performing an automated I/O fencing configuration using response files
      1.  
        Configuring I/O fencing using response files
      2.  
        Response file variables to configure disk-based I/O fencing
      3.  
        Sample response file for configuring disk-based I/O fencing
      4. Response file variables to configure server-based I/O fencing
        1.  
          Sample response file for configuring server-based I/O fencing
      5.  
        Sample response file for configuring non-SCSI-3 I/O fencing
      6.  
        Response file variables to configure non-SCSI-3 I/O fencing
      7.  
        Response file variables to configure majority-based I/O fencing
      8.  
        Sample response file for configuring majority-based I/O fencing
  3. Section III. Upgrade of SFHA
    1. Planning to upgrade SFHA
      1.  
        About the upgrade
      2.  
        Supported upgrade paths
      3.  
        Considerations for upgrading SFHA to 7.4.2 on systems configured with an Oracle resource
      4. Preparing to upgrade SFHA
        1.  
          Getting ready for the upgrade
        2.  
          Creating backups
        3.  
          Determining if the root disk is encapsulated
        4. Pre-upgrade planning when VVR is configured
          1.  
            Considerations for upgrading SFHA to 7.4 or later on systems with an ongoing or a paused replication
          2. Planning an upgrade from the previous VVR version
            1.  
              Planning and upgrading VVR to use IPv6 as connection protocol
        5. Preparing to upgrade VVR when VCS agents are configured
          1. Freezing the service groups and stopping all the applications
            1.  
              Determining the nodes on which disk groups are online
          2.  
            Preparing for the upgrade when VCS agents are configured
        6.  
          Upgrading the array support
      5.  
        Using Install Bundles to simultaneously install or upgrade full releases (base, maintenance, rolling patch), and individual patches
    2. Upgrading Storage Foundation and High Availability
      1. Upgrading Storage Foundation and High Availability from previous versions to 7.4.2
        1.  
          Upgrading Storage Foundation and High Availability using the product installer
      2. Upgrading Volume Replicator
        1. Upgrading VVR without disrupting replication
          1.  
            Upgrading VVR on the Secondary
          2.  
            Upgrading VVR on the Primary
      3.  
        Upgrading SFDB
    3. Performing a rolling upgrade of SFHA
      1.  
        About rolling upgrade
      2.  
        Performing a rolling upgrade using the product installer
    4. Performing a phased upgrade of SFHA
      1. About phased upgrade
        1.  
          Prerequisites for a phased upgrade
        2.  
          Planning for a phased upgrade
        3.  
          Phased upgrade limitations
        4.  
          Phased upgrade example
        5.  
          Phased upgrade example overview
      2. Performing a phased upgrade using the product installer
        1.  
          Moving the service groups to the second subcluster
        2.  
          Upgrading the operating system on the first subcluster
        3.  
          Upgrading the first subcluster
        4.  
          Preparing the second subcluster
        5.  
          Activating the first subcluster
        6.  
          Upgrading the operating system on the second subcluster
        7.  
          Upgrading the second subcluster
        8.  
          Finishing the phased upgrade
    5. Performing an automated SFHA upgrade using response files
      1.  
        Upgrading SFHA using response files
      2.  
        Response file variables to upgrade SFHA
      3.  
        Sample response file for full upgrade of SFHA
      4.  
        Sample response file for rolling upgrade of SFHA
    6. Performing post-upgrade tasks
      1.  
        Optional configuration steps
      2.  
        Re-joining the backup boot disk group into the current disk group
      3.  
        Reverting to the backup boot disk group after an unsuccessful upgrade
      4.  
        Recovering VVR if automatic upgrade fails
      5. Post-upgrade tasks when VCS agents for VVR are configured
        1.  
          Unfreezing the service groups
        2.  
          Restoring the original configuration when VCS agents are configured
        3.  
          CVM master node needs to assume the logowner role for VCS managed VVR resources
      6.  
        Resetting DAS disk names to include host name in FSS environments
      7.  
        Upgrading disk layout versions
      8.  
        Upgrading VxVM disk group versions
      9.  
        Updating variables
      10.  
        Setting the default disk group
      11. About enabling LDAP authentication for clusters that run in secure mode
        1.  
          Enabling LDAP authentication for clusters that run in secure mode
      12.  
        Verifying the Storage Foundation and High Availability upgrade
  4. Section IV. Post-installation tasks
    1. Performing post-installation tasks
      1.  
        Switching on Quotas
      2. About configuring authentication for SFDB tools
        1.  
          Configuring vxdbd for SFDB tools authentication
  5. Section V. Adding and removing nodes
    1. Adding a node to SFHA clusters
      1.  
        About adding a node to a cluster
      2.  
        Before adding a node to a cluster
      3.  
        Adding a node to a cluster using the Veritas InfoScale installer
      4. Adding the node to a cluster manually
        1.  
          Starting Veritas Volume Manager (VxVM) on the new node
        2.  
          Configuring cluster processes on the new node
        3. Setting up the node to run in secure mode
          1.  
            Setting up SFHA related security configuration
        4.  
          Starting fencing on the new node
        5.  
          Configuring the ClusterService group for the new node
      5. Adding a node using response files
        1.  
          Response file variables to add a node to a SFHA cluster
        2.  
          Sample response file for adding a node to a SFHA cluster
      6. Configuring server-based fencing on the new node
        1.  
          Adding the new node to the vxfen service group
      7.  
        After adding the new node
      8.  
        Adding nodes to a cluster that is using authentication for SFDB tools
      9.  
        Updating the Storage Foundation for Databases (SFDB) repository after adding a node
    2. Removing a node from SFHA clusters
      1. Removing a node from a SFHA cluster
        1.  
          Verifying the status of nodes and service groups
        2.  
          Deleting the departing node from SFHA configuration
        3.  
          Modifying configuration files on each remaining node
        4.  
          Removing the node configuration from the CP server
        5.  
          Removing security credentials from the leaving node
        6.  
          Unloading LLT and GAB and removing Veritas InfoScale Availability or Enterprise on the departing node
        7.  
          Updating the Storage Foundation for Databases (SFDB) repository after removing a node
  6. Section VI. Configuration and upgrade reference
    1. Appendix A. Installation scripts
      1.  
        Installation script options
      2.  
        About using the postcheck option
    2. Appendix B. SFHA services and ports
      1.  
        About InfoScale Enterprise services and ports
    3. Appendix C. Configuration files
      1.  
        About the LLT and GAB configuration files
      2.  
        About the AMF configuration files
      3. About the VCS configuration files
        1.  
          Sample main.cf file for VCS clusters
        2.  
          Sample main.cf file for global clusters
      4.  
        About I/O fencing configuration files
      5. Sample configuration files for CP server
        1.  
          Sample main.cf file for CP server hosted on a single node that runs VCS
        2.  
          Sample main.cf file for CP server hosted on a two-node SFHA cluster
        3.  
          Sample CP server configuration (/etc/vxcps.conf) file output
    4. Appendix D. Configuring the secure shell or the remote shell for communications
      1.  
        About configuring secure shell or remote shell communication modes before installing products
      2.  
        Manually configuring passwordless ssh
      3.  
        Setting up ssh and rsh connection using the installer -comsetup command
      4.  
        Setting up ssh and rsh connection using the pwdutil.pl utility
      5.  
        Restarting the ssh session
      6.  
        Enabling rsh for Linux
    5. Appendix E. Sample SFHA cluster setup diagrams for CP server-based I/O fencing
      1. Configuration diagrams for setting up server-based I/O fencing
        1.  
          Two unique client clusters served by 3 CP servers
        2.  
          Client cluster served by highly available CPS and 2 SCSI-3 disks
        3.  
          Two node campus cluster served by remote CP server and 2 SCSI-3 disks
        4.  
          Multiple client clusters served by highly available CP server and 2 SCSI-3 disks
    6. Appendix F. Configuring LLT over UDP
      1. Using the UDP layer for LLT
        1.  
          When to use LLT over UDP
      2. Manually configuring LLT over UDP using IPv4
        1.  
          Broadcast address in the /etc/llttab file
        2.  
          The link command in the /etc/llttab file
        3.  
          The set-addr command in the /etc/llttab file
        4.  
          Selecting UDP ports
        5.  
          Configuring the netmask for LLT
        6.  
          Configuring the broadcast address for LLT
        7.  
          Sample configuration: direct-attached links
        8.  
          Sample configuration: links crossing IP routers
      3. Using the UDP layer of IPv6 for LLT
        1.  
          When to use LLT over UDP
      4. Manually configuring LLT over UDP using IPv6
        1.  
          Sample configuration: direct-attached links
        2.  
          Sample configuration: links crossing IP routers
      5. About configuring LLT over UDP multiport
        1.  
          Manually configuring LLT over UDP multiport
        2.  
          Enabling LLT ports in firewall
        3.  
          Disabling the UDP multiport feature
    7. Appendix G. Using LLT over RDMA
      1.  
        Using LLT over RDMA
      2.  
        About RDMA over RoCE or InfiniBand networks in a clustering environment
      3.  
        How LLT supports RDMA capability for faster interconnects between applications
      4.  
        Using LLT over RDMA: supported use cases
      5. Configuring LLT over RDMA
        1.  
          Choosing supported hardware for LLT over RDMA
        2.  
          Installing RDMA, InfiniBand or Ethernet drivers and utilities
        3. Configuring RDMA over an Ethernet network
          1.  
            Enable RDMA over Converged Ethernet (RoCE)
          2.  
            Configuring RDMA and Ethernet drivers
          3.  
            Configuring IP addresses over Ethernet Interfaces
        4. Configuring RDMA over an InfiniBand network
          1.  
            Configuring RDMA and InfiniBand drivers
          2.  
            Configuring the OpenSM service
          3.  
            Configuring IP addresses over InfiniBand Interfaces
        5. Tuning system performance
          1.  
            Tuning the CPU frequency
          2.  
            Tuning the boot parameter settings
        6. Manually configuring LLT over RDMA
          1.  
            Broadcast address in the /etc/llttab file
          2.  
            The link command in the /etc/llttab file
          3.  
            Selecting UDP ports
          4.  
            Configuring the netmask for LLT
          5.  
            Sample configuration: direct-attached links
        7.  
          LLT over RDMA sample /etc/llttab
        8.  
          Verifying LLT configuration
      6. Troubleshooting LLT over RDMA
        1.  
          IP addresses associated to the RDMA NICs do not automatically plumb on node restart
        2.  
          Ping test fails for the IP addresses configured over InfiniBand interfaces
        3.  
          After a node restart, by default the Mellanox card with Virtual Protocol Interconnect (VPI) gets configured in InfiniBand mode
        4.  
          The LLT module fails to start

Response file variables to configure SFHA

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring SFHA lists the response file variables that you can define to configure SFHA.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring SFHA

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{opt}{configure}

Scalar

Performs the configuration if the RPMs are already installed.

(Required)

Set the value to 1 to configure SFHA.

CFG{accepteula}

Scalar

Specifies whether you agree with EULA.pdf on the media.

(Required)

CFG{activecomponent}

List

Defines the component to be configured.

The value is SFHA7.4.2 for SFHA

(Required)

CFG{keys}{keyless}

CFG{keys}{license}

List

CFG{keys}{keyless} gives a list of keyless keys to be registered on the system.

CFG{keys}{license} gives a list of user defined keys to be registered on the system.

(Optional)

CFG{systems}

List

List of systems on which the product is to be configured.

(Required)

CFG{prod}

Scalar

Defines the product for operations.

The value is ENTERPRISE7.4.2 for Veritas InfoScale Enterprise.

(Required)

CFG{opt}{keyfile}

Scalar

Defines the location of an ssh keyfile that is used to communicate with all remote systems.

(Optional)

CFG{opt}{rsh}

Scalar

Defines that rsh must be used instead of ssh as the communication method between systems.

(Optional)

CFG{opt}{logpath}

Scalar

Mentions the location where the log files are to be copied. The default location is /opt/VRTS/install/logs.

Note:

The installer copies the response files and summary files also to the specified logpath location.

(Optional)

CFG{uploadlogs}

Scalar

Defines a Boolean value 0 or 1.

The value 1 indicates that the installation logs are uploaded to the Veritas website.

The value 0 indicates that the installation logs are not uploaded to the Veritas website.

(Optional)

Note that some optional variables make it necessary to define other optional variables. For example, all the variables that are related to the cluster service group (csgnic, csgvip, and csgnetmask) must be defined if any are defined. The same is true for the SMTP notification (smtpserver, smtprecp, and smtprsev), the SNMP trap notification (snmpport, snmpcons, and snmpcsev), and the Global Cluster Option (gconic, gcovip, and gconetmask).

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring a basic SFHA cluster lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure a basic SFHA cluster.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring a basic SFHA cluster

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{donotreconfigurevcs}

Scalar

Defines if you need to re-configure VCS.

(Optional)

CFG{donotreconfigurefencing}

Scalar

Defines if you need to re-configure fencing.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_clusterid}

Scalar

An integer between 0 and 65535 that uniquely identifies the cluster.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_clustername}

Scalar

Defines the name of the cluster.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_allowcomms}

Scalar

Indicates whether or not to start LLT and GAB when you set up a single-node cluster. The value can be 0 (do not start) or 1 (start).

(Required)

CFG{fencingenabled}

Scalar

In a SFHA configuration, defines if fencing is enabled.

Valid values are 0 or 1.

(Required)

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring private LLT over Ethernet lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure LLT over Ethernet.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring private LLT over Ethernet

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{vcs_lltlink#}

{"system"}

Scalar

Defines the NIC to be used for a private heartbeat link on each system. At least two LLT links are required per system (lltlink1 and lltlink2). You can configure up to four LLT links.

You must enclose the system name within double quotes.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_lltlinklowpri#}

{"system"}

Scalar

Defines a low priority heartbeat link. Typically, lltlinklowpri is used on a public network link to provide an additional layer of communication.

If you use different media speed for the private NICs, you can configure the NICs with lesser speed as low-priority links to enhance LLT performance. For example, lltlinklowpri1, lltlinklowpri2, and so on.

You must enclose the system name within double quotes.

(Optional)

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring LLT over UDP lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure LLT over UDP.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring LLT over UDP

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{lltoverudp}=1

Scalar

Indicates whether to configure heartbeat link using LLT over UDP.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_udplink<n>_address}

{<sys1>}

Scalar

Stores the IP address (IPv4 or IPv6) that the heartbeat link uses on node1.

You can have four heartbeat links and <n> for this response file variable can take values 1 to 4 for the respective heartbeat links.

(Required)

CFG

{vcs_udplinklowpri<n>_address}

{<sys1>}

Scalar

Stores the IP address (IPv4 or IPv6) that the low priority heartbeat link uses on node1.

You can have four low priority heartbeat links and <n> for this response file variable can take values 1 to 4 for the respective low priority heartbeat links.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_udplink<n>_port}

{<sys1>}

Scalar

Stores the UDP port (16-bit integer value) that the heartbeat link uses on node1.

You can have four heartbeat links and <n> for this response file variable can take values 1 to 4 for the respective heartbeat links.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_udplinklowpri<n>_port}

{<sys1>}

Scalar

Stores the UDP port (16-bit integer value) that the low priority heartbeat link uses on node1.

You can have four low priority heartbeat links and <n> for this response file variable can take values 1 to 4 for the respective low priority heartbeat links.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_udplink<n>_netmask}

{<sys1>}

Scalar

Stores the netmask (prefix for IPv6) that the heartbeat link uses on node1.

You can have four heartbeat links and <n> for this response file variable can take values 1 to 4 for the respective heartbeat links.

(Required)

CFG{vcs_udplinklowpri<n>_netmask}

{<sys1>}

Scalar

Stores the netmask (prefix for IPv6) that the low priority heartbeat link uses on node1.

You can have four low priority heartbeat links and <n> for this response file variable can take values 1 to 4 for the respective low priority heartbeat links.

(Required)

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring virtual IP for SFHA cluster lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure virtual IP for SFHA cluster.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring virtual IP for SFHA cluster

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{vcs_csgnic}

{system}

Scalar

Defines the NIC device to use on a system. You can enter 'all' as a system value if the same NIC is used on all systems.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_csgvip}

Scalar

Defines the virtual IP address for the cluster.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_csgnetmask}

Scalar

Defines the Netmask of the virtual IP address for the cluster.

(Optional)

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring SFHA cluster in secure mode lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure the SFHA cluster in secure mode.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring SFHA cluster in secure mode

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{vcs_eat_security}

Scalar

Specifies if the cluster is in secure enabled mode or not.

CFG{opt}{securityonenode}

Scalar

Specifies that the securityonenode option is being used.

CFG{securityonenode_menu}

Scalar

Specifies the menu option to choose to configure the secure cluster one at a time.

  • 1 - Configure the first node

  • 2 - Configure the other node

CFG{secusrgrps}

List

Defines the user groups which get read access to the cluster.

List or scalar: list

Optional or required: optional

CFG{rootsecusrgrps}

Scalar

Defines the read access to the cluster only for root and other users or user groups which are granted explicit privileges in VCS objects.

(Optional)

CFG{security_conf_dir}

Scalar

Specifies the directory where the configuration files are placed.

CFG{opt}{security}

Scalar

Specifies that the security option is being used.

CFG{defaultaccess}

Scalar

Defines if the user chooses to grant read access to everyone.

Optional or required: optional

CFG{vcs_eat_security_fips}

Scalar

Specifies that the enabled security is FIPS compliant.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring VCS users lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure VCS users.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring VCS users

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{vcs_userenpw}

List

List of encoded passwords for VCS users

The value in the list can be "Administrators Operators Guests"

Note:

The order of the values for the vcs_userenpw list must match the order of the values in the vcs_username list.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_username}

List

List of names of VCS users

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_userpriv}

List

List of privileges for VCS users

Note:

The order of the values for the vcs_userpriv list must match the order of the values in the vcs_username list.

(Optional)

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring VCS notifications using SMTP lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure VCS notifications using SMTP.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring VCS notifications using SMTP

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{vcs_smtpserver}

Scalar

Defines the domain-based hostname (example: smtp.example.com) of the SMTP server to be used for web notification.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_smtprecp}

List

List of full email addresses (example: user@example.com) of SMTP recipients.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_smtprsev}

List

Defines the minimum severity level of messages (Information, Warning, Error, SevereError) that listed SMTP recipients are to receive. Note that the ordering of severity levels must match that of the addresses of SMTP recipients.

(Optional)

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring VCS notifications using SNMP lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure VCS notifications using SNMP.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring VCS notifications using SNMP

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{vcs_snmpport}

Scalar

Defines the SNMP trap daemon port (default=162).

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_snmpcons}

List

List of SNMP console system names

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_snmpcsev}

List

Defines the minimum severity level of messages (Information, Warning, Error, SevereError) that listed SNMP consoles are to receive. Note that the ordering of severity levels must match that of the SNMP console system names.

(Optional)

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring SFHA global clusters lists the response file variables that specify the required information to configure SFHA global clusters.

Table: Response file variables specific to configuring SFHA global clusters

Variable

List or Scalar

Description

CFG{vcs_gconic}

{system}

Scalar

Defines the NIC for the Virtual IP that the Global Cluster Option uses. You can enter 'all' as a system value if the same NIC is used on all systems.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_gcovip}

Scalar

Defines the virtual IP address to that the Global Cluster Option uses.

(Optional)

CFG{vcs_gconetmask}

Scalar

Defines the Netmask of the virtual IP address that the Global Cluster Option uses.

(Optional)