How to Check Interface Duplex and Speed Using ndd/kstat on Solaris.

Problem

How to Check Interface Duplex and Speed Using ndd/kstat on Solaris.

Solution

To verify the duplex and speed settings for a network interface.

KSTAT
Using kstat to display network interface variables.

# kstat -p | grep link_ | grep bge


NDD
Use the ndd command to check or set network interface configurables. Some of the more important settings, as the relate to speed and duplex, are as follows:
ndd variable values Description
link_status 0/1 read only 0 = link up, 1 = link down
link_speed 0/1 read only 0 = 10 meg, 1 = 100 meg
link_mode 0/1 read only 0 = half duplex, 1 = full duplex
adv_autoneg_cap 0/1 read/write 0 = autonegotiation off, 1 = autonegotiation on
adv_100T4_cap 0/1 read/write 0 = 100T4 off, 1 = 100T4 on
adv_100fdx_cap 0/1 read/write 0 = 100/full off, 1 = 100/full on
adv_100hdx_cap 0/1 read/write 0 = 100/half off, 1 = 100/half on
adv_10fdx_cap 0/1 read/write 0 = 10/full off, 1 = 10/full on
adv_10hdx_cap 0/1 read/write 0 = 10/half off, 1 = 10/half on

Use the link_status, link_speed, and link_mode variables to check your current network interface. Alternatively you can use 'netstat -k' which is extremely verbose. Use the adv_* variables to set what you want the interface to be capable of.

Note: The tips about link_speed and link_mode do not work with /dev/ce (Gigabit Interfaces). At this time you have to use `netstat -k` for getting speed and status information.

Example
# ndd /dev/bge0 link_duplex
2
# ndd /dev/bge0 link_autoneg
1
# ndd /dev/bge0 link_status
1
# ndd /dev/bge0 link_speed
1000
 

 

Terms of use for this information are found in Legal Notices.

Search

Survey

Did this article answer your question or resolve your issue?

No
Yes

Did this article save you the trouble of contacting technical support?

No
Yes

How can we make this article more helpful?

Email Address (Optional)